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BENQ GW2450 By David Hague

(c) Auscam Online Auscam is our partner in Australasia and has a website at www.auscamonline.com plus their magazine can be subscribed to from that address or by emailing david@auscamonline.com

It's not often I get the chance to review a monitor; in the main monitor manufacturers tend to overlook Auscam, possible forgetting that everyone who does video editing has one or usually two monitors nailed to their PC and perhaps even a third strictly used for playback.

In fact, in the video world monitors are probably more critical than any everyday old computer monitor is. Serious photographers who play with Photoshop will know what I mean. Calibration is everything.

Which leads me neatly to the BENQ GW2450 which landed on my desk today.

I am a writer and editor who understands colour but when it comes to the technical aspects of why a good monitor IS a good monitor, I had to go a-searching and the results were interesting. In simple terms, there is cheapo and cheerful, mid-range and excellent colour and then expensive with top shelf colour, but in terms of using for editing, colour grading and photography has downsides.

The cheap and cheerful are known as TN panels and these are fast and responsive, but let down by narrow viewing angles, they're not as bright as some and the colour repo is not that flash.

At the top end are IPS based monitors and these have super colour, wide viewing angle and they are s-l-o-w in comparison to VA based panels. These have much better viewing angles than TN panels, a far superior brightness an exceptionally good response time (but admittedly not as fast as TN panels) but the kicker for video and colour grading is they have the best blacks. I am told this is Very Important.